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Thread: How to reproduce parts.

  1. #16
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Location
    Springfield, MO
    --
    144
    Thanks again John for the detailed how-to. I definitely have some junk intakes to go along with a NOS one. I'll have to start whittling on one to get to the plate.

  2. #17
    Join Date
    Apr 2002
    Location
    s.w. michigan
    --
    6,500
    "Whittling" away at the old intake boot to get the metal face plate is a very good term of expression !
    I have often replied back to folks when they have asked me if I wanted their old intake boot(s) so I could reuse the oem face plate to make replacement boots,,,,, I would NOT be making intake boots if I had to use that process ~ the oem ones are vulcanized,bonded to the metal in such a way it is a challenge to get all the old rubber off.
    Now, with that said. If you are planning on a short run of those intake boots, say maybe 3 or 4 or what ever and have enough junkers to utilize, it may be well worth your time to simply use reclaimed oem metal intake boot face plates.
    I placed order with Smooth on for more shore 80A urathane rubber resin that will cover 3 out of 4 of our products that we are out of stock of (Tecate intake boots being one of those items). I noticed in the back of catalog information about bonding agents so I asked the tech about that particular product. He advised that is not what I needed but has in stock (not in catalog or on web site) a product that will make bonding of urethane rubber to my alu face plates,,, well supposed to become one with each other (marry together to become one).
    Needless to say I am quite stoked about that product since I have had to deal with some separation from time to time. I will post up more about that stuff once I get it and use + make a boot or two. Probably looking at next week end for that update.

  3. #18
    Join Date
    Apr 2002
    Location
    s.w. michigan
    --
    6,500
    So, anyone taken the time to call and ask for any of the above companies catalogs ?

    That product to bond resins to alu is fantastic. It is a Sherwin Williams product so most likely can be bought at any Sherwin Williams dealer.

  4. #19
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Location
    Chesterfield, Virginia
    --
    845
    Not yet, but I plan on it, as soon as I devise a way to make a mold from a styrofoam tank model for my R5 (TZ Replica) project (I know, its not enough wheels but at least its a 2-Stroke...lol)
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    PLEASE KEEP AN EYE OUT FOR THE FOLLOWING STOLEN 3/30/2012

    1999 ATK 260LQ ENG# 425681 Red/White/Blue VIN# 4MAV1CC43XA009376 (Its the last one missing out of four the first three were destroyed)

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  5. #20
    Join Date
    Apr 2002
    Location
    s.w. michigan
    --
    6,500
    Call Troy @ BJB. Believe me, he wants you to succeed and so do I NO matter what your project is ! http://www.bjbenterprises.com/epoxy/...d-part-sealer/
    I have thought about gas tanks and other large mass molds and it seems to be much more economical to use a blanket mold approach (definitely more advance + time consuming then I have done so far but it is all about your confidence level and taking it 1 step at a time IMHO)
    The only resins I have found to be gasoline proof (so far) is Alumilite's amazing casting resin line up BUT cure time is way to quick for much of anything (3 minute cup time after A meets B resins but at least it don't need vacuuming).

  6. #21
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Location
    Chesterfield, Virginia
    --
    845
    I was actually leaning fiberglass with a three part mold (right left combination then adding the bottom/tunnel) your post opened up alot of considerations. The closest thing to what I want that I could find is fiberglass and around $600, to me even If I spend that or more to be able to say I made it myself is well worth it... John, your an inspiration to say the least...
    TRIKE INTERESTS
    A1/A2 TECATE's

    BIKE INTERESTS
    ATK, Husqvarna, Maico, Harley Davidson & Yamaha Twins

    PLEASE KEEP AN EYE OUT FOR THE FOLLOWING STOLEN 3/30/2012

    1999 ATK 260LQ ENG# 425681 Red/White/Blue VIN# 4MAV1CC43XA009376 (Its the last one missing out of four the first three were destroyed)

    My Feedback

  7. #22
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Location
    Terryville,CT
    --
    1,616
    very inspiring that is for sure!
    2- 85 Tri-Z's black and Yellow
    2- 85 250SX's
    1- 85 200X
    3-ATC 70's
    2- 85 tri-zinger's who needs some parts

  8. #23
    Join Date
    Dec 2012
    Location
    Alberta
    --
    36
    This is awesome info. Thanks guys!! Love learning new things.

  9. #24
    Join Date
    Apr 2002
    Location
    s.w. michigan
    --
    6,500
    Quote Originally Posted by HuffieVA View Post
    I was actually leaning fiberglass with a three part mold (right left combination then adding the bottom/tunnel) your post opened up alot of considerations. The closest thing to what I want that I could find is fiberglass and around $600, to me even If I spend that or more to be able to say I made it myself is well worth it... John, your an inspiration to say the least...
    On my lunch hour I was reading about the "mother mold" concept. it is supposed to cut down on the amount of the mold rubber used in making a very large part,,, like a fuel tank.
    The mold rubber can add up in a heck of a hurry dollar wise so I can imagine using a brush on coating to get the exact detail, then backing it up with a spray foam in the mold box would hugely cut down material cost.
    I think a 3 piece mold for something like a fuel tank would be perfect route to go. You would be able to plan your parting lines out exactly where you would like them and another plus is being able to de-mold so much easier.
    Hopefully the resin makers come up with a slow setting, gas resistant material in the near future. The only material I have found to be fuel resistant is Alumilites Amazing casting resin and a couple other sister products. The bad, work time is well under 5 minutes once A + B are mixed.

  10. #25
    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Location
    springfield, MO
    --
    86
    not sure if my dad or bro brought this up, but i'm sure you're tracking that we're trying to reproduce those '86 headlight plastics.
    zach and i think if we poured the mold at an angle until the bottom air release fills up with resin then plug that and continue to pour at an angle to make sure it fills all the air bubbles and whatnot.
    we think it'll work but i'm just asking for another opinion.

    yea or nay? or suggestions cause we keep getting one or 2 bubbles in very irritating areas and they're not consistent since we have all those fixed
    SAWFLY
    It's not stolen, I just happen to have the same thing

  11. #26
    Join Date
    Apr 2002
    Location
    s.w. michigan
    --
    6,500
    Yeah,,, ! I kinda forgot about you folks doing those, awesome !
    Yes, vent hole stratigally placed take awy those pesky air entrapment problems. I use very small brake line and my cordless drill set on high speed to drill the mold rubber.
    Just bevle the edge of the tubing and it walks right on thru your mold rubber.
    Not all my molds utilize venting but for example I have turned all my intake boot "squish" molds into pour molds and by doing so there is a high spot inside that created a air pocket, I drill a vent hole at the top of that area that works perfectly.
    Once I pull the intake boot out of mold I have a long thin piece of rubber that I simply snip off.

    Sawfly, please put up some pictures of you guys work or refresh my memory of the link.

    Thanks ! john

  12. #27
    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Location
    springfield, MO
    --
    86
    zach and i are gonna pour one tonight so ill post some pics of it when we get done
    SAWFLY
    It's not stolen, I just happen to have the same thing

  13. #28
    Join Date
    Apr 2002
    Location
    s.w. michigan
    --
    6,500

    So,,,,,,

    Anybody given a go for making parts of any kind with this style of procedure, or variations of ???
    The Mrs and I are finishing off resins we have on hand before our next new mold project begins since it will use different materials.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails 20150404_194940.jpg  

  14. #29
    Join Date
    Aug 2016
    Location
    East of Worcester ma
    --
    920
    We texted/chatted last wk--Thank you for the tincure/30yr old rubber tip. Thanks for all the info actually...
    I have a couple questions if thats ok?
    Do you still use the food grade silicone oil for storage in a sealed container?
    do you keep a part in the mold so it holds its shape?
    Color/pigment - the company smooth on has regular or uvo- sunlight version- i ordered the sample pack regular pigment but maybe should have gotten the other. Hmmmm

    I have a couple catalogs on the way/your right it will be alot easier when its in front of me instead of searching around online and taking notes. (Lots of notes)
    Just messing around with plastic/rubber this time around- theres definetly a large learning curve.
    Have a few hundred dollars in stuff on its way- from plastic tounge depressors(stir sticks) to large syringes and a scale, release spray, and a few different smaller size plastics/rubber mixes to play with, It should be fun..... But sure does add up quick! I'll add some pics here in a few days if thats ok.

    Sorry for all the questions, not to many but any info would be help(thanks again)
    Shep
    Last edited by Shep1970; 06-16-2017 at 11:10 PM.

  15. #30
    Join Date
    Apr 2002
    Location
    s.w. michigan
    --
    6,500
    Great , glad you are havin a go at this Shep !
    We use the food grade silicone to wipe inside of mold for rejuvenation and log term stoage.
    Old butter knifes work excellent for stir stick but may be to big for smaller cups of resin mix (hard to balance on or off scale). Rubbing alcohol to clean up metal stir sticks and occasional drippings that happen. Lots of paper towels on hand keeps messes in check also. Rubbing alcohol will clean the plastic tounge depresses well so long as mix hasn't cured to much

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