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Thread: Progressive Spring Kit for 85 250R

  1. #1
    DDQ's Avatar
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    Progressive Spring Kit for 85 250R

    I see that the the 85 R has two oem fork springs and the 86 R has one. I am confused that the progressive spring kit is the same for the 85 and 86. Does the progressive kit replace the two 85 oem springs with one or am I just not seeing the 85 kit which should have two springs per fork?

  2. #2
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    The progressive spring replaces the 2 oem spings on the 85.
    250r rules

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    DDQ's Avatar
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    Thank you.

    In your opinion, does the progresseive spring make a noticeable difference given that I will be replacing seals and oil anyway or is the oil weight the bigger factor in performance?

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  4. #4
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    The OEM springs get tired after all these years of being pre-loaded.

    I honestly would say just changing the oil to a 15wt fork oil will benefit you the most, but I normally often swap over to progressives springs at the same time.

    If we weren't so afraid of changing things up, there are other springs/rates, and emulators that can be purchased and they are very adjustable.

    Seems like lots of work, but once you're dialed in, you are all set!!
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  5. #5
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    I ride my 350X in the rocky, rooted woods of New England, I immediately noticed a huge improvement after swapping to progressive springs. I don't even feel the small rocks and roots that used to deflect my front tire with the stock setup. For my type of riding it was a night and day difference, your mileage may vary.

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by DDQ View Post
    Thank you.

    In your opinion, does the progresseive spring make a noticeable difference given that I will be replacing seals and oil anyway or is the oil weight the bigger factor in performance?

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    They absolutely do. Especially if you are heavier, ride more complicated terrain or jump. I have used several sets and the work better when you abuse them.
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    DDQ's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dirtcrasher View Post
    The OEM springs get tired after all these years of being pre-loaded.

    I honestly would say just changing the oil to a 15wt fork oil will benefit you the most, but I normally often swap over to progressives springs at the same time.

    If we weren't so afraid of changing things up, there are other springs/rates, and emulators that can be purchased and they are very adjustable.

    Seems like lots of work, but once you're dialed in, you are all set!!
    Who makes other springs?

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  8. #8
    barnett468 is offline FACT ! I have no edit button Arm chair racerThe day begins with 3WW
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    Quote Originally Posted by DDQ View Post
    Thank you.

    In your opinion, does the progresseive spring make a noticeable difference given that I will be replacing seals and oil anyway or is the oil weight the bigger factor in performance?
    Just curious as to what you don't like about the stock setup and what you are hoping to achieve with the progressive springs.

    Oil level also affects performance. Air can also be added to the forks to change how they perform, but air can mix with the oil some after around 20 minutes of hard riding causing the damping to be reduced. Dry nitrogen does not mix as easily.

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  9. #9
    DDQ's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by barnett468 View Post
    Just curious as to what you don't like about the stock setup and what you are hoping to achieve with the progressive springs.

    Oil level also affects performance. Air can also be added to the forks to change how they perform, but air can mix with the oil some after around 20 minutes of hard riding causing the damping to be reduced. Dry nitrogen does not mix as easily.

    .
    My fork seals are blown which is how they were when I bought the bike. I do not know anything except that they bounce up and down over and over when I push down on the front end


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  10. #10
    barnett468 is offline FACT ! I have no edit button Arm chair racerThe day begins with 3WW
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    Quote Originally Posted by DDQ View Post
    My fork seals are blown which is how they were when I bought the bike. I do not know anything except that they bounce up and down over and over when I push down on the front end
    What is your skill level?

    What type of riding will you be doing?

    Are you on a budget?

    I'm sure the progressive springs will be nice as others have mentioned, but if you are on a budget, and are a recreational rider, the stock forks aren't bad at all, and I would be more concerned about the rear end and put money there if I had to choose between the two.

    The fork springs are extremely easy to change, and since you haven't ridden the bike yet, it seems unnecessary to me to try and fix a problem that may not exist in your particular case before you even ride it with properly functioning stock forks.

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  11. #11
    DDQ's Avatar
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    I weigh 210 lbs and ride aggressively on trail, dunes and plan to race mx.
    I have pulled the rear shock off and it is going out for a revalve this week.
    I am a long time quad rider and run long travel custom axis suspension on my banshee for the same type of riding.
    I have a 350x with stock fork setup and it is way too soft.
    So based od dirtcrashers comment, I am very curious if progressive springs are my only option or if stiffer springs are available.


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  12. #12
    barnett468 is offline FACT ! I have no edit button Arm chair racerThe day begins with 3WW
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    ok, you will probably want a stiffer rear spring, but i would try it first with the revalve, although i could easily bottom a stock rear 86 250r shock back in 86, and i only weigh 155 lbs.

    the stock fork springs are definitely too soft for you. as far as stiffer springs then the progressive ones being available, i wouldn't know, but someone else here may, however, you can call race tech also and ask them about both front and rear springs and see what they say, as they may be familiar with the progressive rate ones. eibach may make you some custom springs as well.

    http://www.racetech.com/

    https://eibach.com/us/

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  13. #13
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    I like Progressive springs a lot because they are, well, progressive. They are wound in such a way where they have good small bump compliance but ramp up with big hits and jumps. Some kits come with adjustable spacers, i.e., pvc tubing you cut to length depending on your weight. I always start long and cut them down until I get the feel I want. You can also buy cartridge emulators from Race Tech. They give you even more adjustability. They sit on top of the damping rod and allow you to adjust the oil flow (compression damping). You have to drill out the damping rod holes, though, so they are no longer the limiting factor. Race Tech has some good videos about their emulators on youtube.

  14. #14
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    If you're taking in the rear for service, take the forks with ya. Do both to full race spec to your weight. Depending on your Vendor(susp/service) has or may have an alternative in Spring Co. I like my Progressive fork Springs over stock on the MX setup I run a solid spacer and replace to top Spring(for a Tri Z) to add extra stiffness.

  15. #15
    DDQ's Avatar
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    What benefit does a spacer offer and where does it go?
    I plan to send the rear to Rocket Ron in Indiana and want to do the forks myself. I have already ordered the fork oil and seals.

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