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Thread: how much does it usually cost for rebore or hone of your cylinder?

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Dec 2004
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    Pa.'s Highest City
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    8,058

    how much does it usually cost for rebore or hone of your cylinder?

    I'm sure diffrent place=diffrent prices. If it aint bad the usually just hone it out.can some explaine these processes and price diffrences. Thanks

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Oct 2004
    Location
    Opelousas, Louisiana
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    1,337
    you can get a hone for a drill and do it yourself. honing is to deglaze the cylinder. if it isnt too worn you can just hone it and rering. this roughs it up into a crosshatch pattern instead of being completely smooth (glazed) so the oil lubricates properly.
    when it is worn too much you will need to bore or resleeve. when i did my 110 i took my cylinder to a honda dealer and traded it for one that was bored and payed like 15 or 20 bucks. then i just had to get the right size piston and rings for it.
    to check how worn it is just stick your old top ring in the cylinder and use the piston to push it down a little ways so it is even. then just get a feeler guage and check the ring end gap. a manual will show the tolerances and wear limits.
    1986 350X K&N filter, DG Krome Power exhaust
    1982 110 UNI filter, Cobra megaphone exhaust

    1982 honda 110 exhaust for sale, PM me.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Nov 2002
    Location
    Kirkville, NY
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    I have had a cylinder honed for $15 then I ended up buying a cylinder hone from sears later for $20 or so. Boring usually cost $50-$60 around here.
    1984 Yamaha YT 60 Tri Zinger(current project)
    1983 Yamaha YTM 200 (rear suspension kit)..... long term project
    2004 BMW R1150R
    1972 Honda CT 70
    2007 Lifan 110

  4. #4
    leprogle's Avatar
    leprogle is offline At The Back Of The Pack Arm chair racerAt the back of the pack
    Join Date
    Mar 2003
    Location
    New Brunswick
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    boring costs 20 dollars at a local bike shop, here in musquash. the guy is a honda guru, and told me that when the cylinder wears out, it is like a barrel effect, and wears mostly in the middle, unlike a car, you can't just replace the rings, and if you hone it, it will work better, but still burn oil when the piston is at the middle of the cylinder. he also says that honing a worn cylinder, makes it like a record, and has fine grooves in the cylinder, and will not seal right. the PROPER way, is to bore, and get it perfectly smooth. then hone, honing is just meant for the finishing touch.
    Caution
    Do not "POP WHEELIES" and run for any distance with the ATC. The oil capacity is relatively small and the oil will drain out of the oil pump area thus causing loss of oil pressure, resulting in costly engine damage -CLYMER

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Dec 2004
    Location
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    This might be a dumb question but when do you know its time for a hone or rebore. Will it smoke real bad annd will you have a loss sov power? thanks

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Nov 2003
    Location
    Oswego, IL
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    depends on the shape of the cylinder. if it is reall scratched up get a bore if just lil scratches you can only tell with your finger nail get a hone. i got to hone tool for 20 bucks. but it only cost 20 to do it from the shop i say have the shop do it. you will get a beter cross stich pattern.
    1974 atc 90 project underway cuzzztom

    1985 atc 110 for sale

    84 200s all original got off the first and only owner
    new carb
    maybe putting my 200x cam in it but not sure

    old trike
    1985 200x
    12.1 piston
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  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jun 2004
    Location
    potsdam ny
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    1,227
    i paid 30$ for an awesome bore/hone job up here at an auto parts store....not all engine building guys can do 2 stroke cylinders due to the ports...the boring bit can catch on the ports and snap off the carbide( i think thats what it is)...which can cost those guys big$$....you have to get a self centering bore bar(i think)....cant quite remember...
    1985 Honda ATC250R drag trike with s/t kit and full drag CR hybrid motor and drag chassis...
    1986 Honda ATC250R daily rider fully modded engine, +4 swinger,etc...
    1997 Polaris Storm 800 triple, boyesen reeds, dg individual silencers, 240 studs, 123mph on radar...

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Jun 2004
    Location
    Brazil, Indiana
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    1,389
    it cost me 20 bucks for a bore and hone job at the local car mechanic place type deal..lol..couldnt think of what it was called...anyway..they did a really good job for my 185!
    trikes owned:
    85' 200m - sold
    84' 200x - sold
    83' 185s - sold
    82' 185s - sold
    85' 350x !!! - selling

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Oct 2004
    Location
    Opelousas, Louisiana
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    burning alot of oil, smoking.
    fouled plugs from oil blowby
    1986 350X K&N filter, DG Krome Power exhaust
    1982 110 UNI filter, Cobra megaphone exhaust

    1982 honda 110 exhaust for sale, PM me.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Oct 2002
    Location
    Northeast
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    Quote Originally Posted by chrisr200x
    Again, anyone know when it is time to get this done?
    You have to take it in and get it measured in a few spots - especially the middle. There really is NO other way. You can't look at it and guess unless it's scored up and lots of cylinders look good but need boring. If there are a bunch of hours on it, it most likely needs to be bored.
    [SIZE=4]WHO IS Q?? SERIOUSLY - DID THEY EXPOSE ALL THEIR CRIMES JUST TO DISTRACT US?? JUST MADE US MORE FURIOUS!![/B]

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Dec 2004
    Location
    Pa.'s Highest City
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    So if it's not a two smoker I can take it to a automotive mechanic to do this? The reason I ask is I'm not having really good luck with the motorcycle mechanics in my area.

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Jul 2004
    Location
    minnesota
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    689
    ahh...just go buy a hone and do it yourself, you will most likely need it again anyways so just buy it and do it your self, i got my hone from the carquest auto parts store for around$30, i was able to do all sized 2 and 4 strokes from 50cc-300cc with no ploblem at all.
    my trikes:
    1983 honda atc 200x-k&n filter
    2002 yamaha raptor 660r, yoshimura slip on, prm grab bars
    1978 chevy nova, 454 v8, bds blower, 150hp shot of nitrous, full roll cage, a real power house.
    1991 chevy s10 4x4 350v8.
    1986 250sx
    YES its fast NO you cant ride it.

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Dec 2004
    Location
    Pa.'s Highest City
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    Does anyone have a pic of this hone so i know what i'm looking for...also do I need a drill press?

  14. #14
    Join Date
    Dec 2003
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    SE PA
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    683
    Ok, let me try to set you guys straight on this matter by sharing my knowlege of this subject. I am a certified auto mechanic and I have been working on all kinds of engines, mostly bikes and trikes, for about 14 years now and I have dealt with this many times. Not sure what type of motor you have, but let's just assume 4 stroke for a minute. As engines wear over the years, the cylinder bore and the rings lose some metal and the clearances between them become greater. This results in compression loss and oil burning, which tells you it's time to rebuild. Leprogle explained pretty well about what happens to the bore as it wears out. It becomes tapered, and the piston wears to match it. Unless the cylinder is pretty fresh, honing and throwing in a new piston is not going to give you the results you desire. Usually when a 4 stroke has worn out a top end, it has run for a long time and there is a lot of wear in the cylinder that you cannot see unless you measure with a micrometer. A proper bore job cannot be done without first having the piston in hand that you are going to use. The cylinder should be matched against the piston, so that the proper clearance is obtained. Many pistons vary in diameter by thousandths of an inch, which makes a big difference in the way your motor performs.

    Now let's assume 2 strokes. A 2 stroke cylinder wears much more quiclkly, for many reasons. The biggest reason is that it receives its lubrication through the gas and not from a pump directly pumping oil into it (unless it's injected). 2 strokes require more frequent rebuilds, and often you will find scoring in the cylinder when it's worn out. When you disassemble the top end, look at the piston. The crown will have carbon on it, and the brown color will extend down into the area where the rings sit in the piston. If there is evidence of the brown color below the bottom ring, that means the compression rings are leaking, your motor is experiencing compression loss, and you are losing power. If the cylinder has a somewhat recent bore and shows no evidence of scoring, simply honing it and re-ringing it will probably get you by. This is actually more of a maintenance procedure for 2 strokes. When it is time to bore, 2 strokes have large ports in the cylinder walls that need to be chamfered after the boring is done. Some have a narrow bridge between the exhaust ports that needs to be clearanced, since that part heats up faster than the rest of the cylinder. For this reason, when boring a 2 stroke you should use a shop that is experienced with these types of cylinders.
    A few things to keep in mind:
    ATV motors tend to run hotter and at higher RPM than car engines, so they will wear much quicker. When rebuilding a car motor many guys just hone out the jugs, since they don't usually suffer the extreme wear that we see in many of the bike motors. The proper way to do a top end job, though, is to bore the cylinder (s) and match to the new pistons.
    A common cause in 4 strokes of oil burning and compression loss is worn valve guides/seals and leaking valve seats. When rebuilding your 4 stroke, don't forget to replace the valve seals, inspect the seats, and re-lap the valve seats with lapping compound.
    After a cylinder is bored it must be finish honed. When honing a cylinder, you want to end up with a cross-hatched pattern in the walls. This allows the rings to seat better, and the cross hatching actually holds oil so that the jug stays lubricated.
    A good bore job around here costs $40 to 50 per hole for 4 stroke, and $50-60 per hole for a 2 stroke (2 strokes are more because of the time required to chamfer the ports). Most machine shops are capable of doing this, and in fact smaller shops will often send your parts out to a machine shop rather than do the boring in-house. I use a machine shop that specializes in automotive and small engine work. The cycle shops around here just don't seem to care and the turnaround time can be very lengthy. I have had no luck with any of them around here either, that's why I started doing the work myself. Your local repiar garage may be able to hone a cylinder, but they will not have the expensive equipment required to do a bore job. My advice is to call or visit a few machine shops and try to find one that does small engine work.
    And finally, to answer your question about how do you know it's time for a top end job, 4 strokes usually will start to burn some oil, or you may feel that it just doesn't have the power that it used to. 2 strokes will either stop running, won't rev out and make any power, or the powerband will just start to feel soft. With a 2 stroke it's a good idea to disassemble the top end and inspect it once a season.
    Hope this helps.
    ~ Rob ~
    Last edited by grundlegrabber; 03-24-2005 at 11:35 PM.

  15. #15
    Join Date
    Dec 2004
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    Wow, that is ALOT of typing 2 days worth for us slow folks. lol

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